Category Archives: Book Project

Back from Break

Good critiques this week, folks, thanks. Don’t forget, visit the flickr group to give and get additional feedback.

Although there was a previous post on pairing typefaces, Hoefler & Frere-Jones just this week released an email newsletter addressing that topic. You can find it online. And speaking of email newsletters from type foundries, you should sign up for them—all you can find—because they frequently contain interesting and educational info on type.

Sign up:

Just a reminder that Wednesday’s lecture on intellectual property and copyright is summarized in a post from last semester, with links to more info.

Layout for the first fourth of your book is due Monday. Bring in printouts for peer critiques (I will circulate during class.) Manuscripts are due Wednesday, March 24.

Spring Work, not Break

Today we’re having a lecture on Book Design and on Grids. It’s somewhat of an overview/inspiration to get you thinking more about what you will do with your book. The readings to complete over the next week and a half are:

“You Can Judge a Book by its Cover,” from HOW Magazine. In the Box.

On book design:

And, on grids:

There is also an updated calendar schedule in the Box. Don’t forget that your outlines and your initial comps (3 sets) are due Monday after Spring Break. Ironically, that is also the Ides of March. So, avoid critique assassination and come prepared!

Revised Schedules & Today’s Lecture Topics

Given the missed 2 weeks of classes, I have revised the overall semester schedule, as well as the due dates on both the Brochure and Book projects. New PDFs are in the Box.

We have an ambitious schedule today. In addition to discussing your 10 sketches/approaches, I’m hoping to discuss as much of the following as possible:

  • Binding
  • Paper (grades, mills, companies)
  • PDFs (controlling settings)
  • Utilities (software)
  • Type selection (see previous PDF with foundry links)
  • Image selection (see previous PDF with image source links)
  • Photoshop clipping paths (pen tool)
  • Color selection
  • Colorspace for print (process, spot)
  • Printing Processes

For review/reference to the aforementioned topics, the Box contains these documents for you:

  • AVT498_Binding&Paper.pdf
  • AVT498_PDFs+Util+Color+Printing.pdf

And in preparation for our critique on Wednesday, please download and review the critique guidelines and read the articles that are linked therein.

  • AVT498_Critique.pdf

See you soon!

Sugar and Spice

Sugar and Spice
Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed on and digested.
FRANCIS BACON
As you move full swing into your book development and design, here are some online sources to further inform and inspire.
On book design:
On grids:
(Follow the links to parts 2 thru 5)
On kerning:
This is just a small sampling of resources. Also, if you haven’t already, download the article, You Can Judge a Book by Its Cover in the Box, generously permitted by HOW Magazine.
We’ll leave book cover design and the plethora of online galleries and blogs for another post.

Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed on and digested.
—FRANCIS BACON

As you move full swing into your book development and design, your goal should be to control the pacing and exhibit variety within consistency. And of course to have impeccable typography, and leave room for a surprise or two.

Here are some online sources to further inform and inspire.

On book design:

The underlying structure of your page (spread), once designed, is there to make your life easier in the layout phase, and to provide clarity for your reader. But don’t get lazy! Decide when it may be appropriate to break the grid for meaning, for logistics, for spark.

On grids:

On kerning (since we talked about it in class today and you know this is a subject dear to me):

This is just a small sampling of resources… Also, if you haven’t already, download the article, You Can Judge a Book by Its Cover in the Box, generously permitted by HOW Magazine.

We’ll leave book cover design and the plethora of online galleries and blogs for another post.

Make a list, check it twice.

I’m feeling magnanimous today. I’ve retooled, updated, and expanded a checklist that I developed (originally with co-worker, Catherine Anderson) many years ago. The principles hold true, and if you want your designs to print as you imagine them in all their glory, you would be wise to follow this counsel.
Okay, pompous talk aside, there are so many pitfalls in printing, do your part and the potential errors will be minimized.
The checklist is in the Box, download and enjoy.
Also, in case you aren’t familiar with proofreaders’ marks, these sites have good reference sheets. As a designer, you will receive instructions using these symbols, so you must interpret them correctly.
This one is good for printing out. http://www.merriam-webster.com/mw/table/proofrea.htm
And actually, there are a lot of good resources on designerstoolbox.com including this handy binding styles reference. http://www.designerstoolbox.com/designresources/bindings/ Remember that you are not allowed to do velo, plastic comb, or side stitched binding for this class.

I’m feeling magnanimous today. I’ve retooled, updated, and expanded a checklist that I developed (originally with co-worker, Catherine Anderson) many years ago. The principles hold true, and if you want your designs to print as you imagine them in all their glory, you would be wise to follow this counsel.

Okay, pompous talk aside, there are so many pitfalls in printing, do your part and the potential errors will be minimized.

The checklist is in the Box, download and enjoy.

Also, in case you aren’t familiar with proofreaders’ marks, the following sites have good reference pages. As a designer, you will receive instructions using these symbols, so you must interpret them correctly.

This one is good for printing out.

This one is interactive.

This one is well-designed.

And actually, there are a lot of good resources on designerstoolbox.com including this handy binding styles reference.  Remember that you are not allowed to do velo, plastic comb, or side stitched binding for this class. They look cheap.