Category Archives: Brochure Project

It’s All Good

Thanks for a good first day of class today, everyone. The PDF of the syllabus and schedule are in the BOX, as well as the PDF of the brochure project.

Want to be inspired by design for good? Check these out:

Have more examples? List them in the comments.

Wednesday, bring in your 3 narrowed down topic choices, with potential approaches or solutions. You will present your ideas to the class, and come away with a firm decision for your brochure topic.

And don’t forget the Flickr exercise!

Outlines are In

I don’t want to sound condescending, but I am truly perplexed at how many of you did not turn in actual outlines for your Outline Assignment for your brochure. I would think you would have been making outlines since middle school or high school, at least! The benefits of an outline include organizing your thoughts and research in a cohesive, hierarchical way so that your resulting brochure text will make sense and have a logical flow. For “why and how,” see this useful resource from Purdue University.

Outlines should be summaries, quick facts, notes, lists. Although there is an outline form known as sentence outlines, when asked in class, I specifically said I wanted ABC—123. This is known as an alphanumeric outline, and easily found with a simple Google search: What is an outline?

The main sections are identified with Roman numerals, the next level is identified with uppercase letters, the next with Arabic numerals, next with lowercase letters, and next with lowercase Roman numerals. As shown below:

I.      Blah blah blahblah blah blahblahblah

A.      Blah blah blahblah blah blahblahblah

1.      Blah blah blahblah blah blahblahblah

a.      Blah blah blahblah blah blahblahblah

b.      Blah blah blahblah blah blahblahblah

c.      Blah blah blahblah blah blahblahblah

i.      Blah blah blahblah

ii.      Blah blah blahblah blah

iii.      Blah blah blahblah

2.      Blah blah blahblah blah blahblahblah

3.      Blah blah blahblah blah blahblahblah

B.      Blah blah blahblah blah blahblahblah

C.      Blah blah blahblah blah blahblahblah

II.      Blah blah blahblah blah blahblahblah

III.     Blah blah blahblah blah blahblahblah

Even if you make a sentence outline, writing actual paragraphs with transitions and conversational tone is a no-no. That would be your text, your manuscript.

Another thing that is not included in an outline is any kind of design direction or notation. The place for that is in the creative brief or in the actual comp. The outline is meant to help your writing and summarize the main points, not describe it. Please review these points for your book outlines, when it comes time, and/or take a look at other resources for outlines.

Focus on the Type

I think we had mostly constructive critiques today. If you disagree and don’t think you got enough advice, or you make changes and want more advice, don’t be shy—post images to the Flickr group and ask for feedback. Be sure to identity who your audience is, and provide any relevant information in the description.

Hopefully, you’re now working on a strong concept and will get busy with the full 12 pages of layout. As you do that, remember that your piece should have some kind of consistency to hold it together, but also have some surprises or variety to keep it interesting. You don’t want every spread to be the same because even in a short brochure it may bore very quickly. Think about how you treat images, color palettes, type.

And speaking of type, for this next round you should really focus on the type. Pick your typefaces appropriately. Don’t mix serifs or sans serifs. Generally speaking, you should pick one family of serif type, one family of sans serif, perhaps a display and/or a script. But even within that, don’t overdo the style usage. Have a reason for why you picked which faces, other than “I like it.” Pay close attention to spacing, margins, columns, widths. Do not place type haphazardly. Make and use paragraph and character style sheets for consistency on styling/formatting; make and use master pages for consistency on folio placement, margins, text box placements, etc.

Don’t forget the details like using only one space after a period or punctuation mark. Download the document “TypeTreatments.pdf” from the Box for some other helpful hints. Review your type book for other details.

Work hard!

Revised Schedules & Today’s Lecture Topics

Given the missed 2 weeks of classes, I have revised the overall semester schedule, as well as the due dates on both the Brochure and Book projects. New PDFs are in the Box.

We have an ambitious schedule today. In addition to discussing your 10 sketches/approaches, I’m hoping to discuss as much of the following as possible:

  • Binding
  • Paper (grades, mills, companies)
  • PDFs (controlling settings)
  • Utilities (software)
  • Type selection (see previous PDF with foundry links)
  • Image selection (see previous PDF with image source links)
  • Photoshop clipping paths (pen tool)
  • Color selection
  • Colorspace for print (process, spot)
  • Printing Processes

For review/reference to the aforementioned topics, the Box contains these documents for you:

  • AVT498_Binding&Paper.pdf
  • AVT498_PDFs+Util+Color+Printing.pdf

And in preparation for our critique on Wednesday, please download and review the critique guidelines and read the articles that are linked therein.

  • AVT498_Critique.pdf

See you soon!

Today!

I know, it’s not a very compelling title.

On the agenda for today: your creative briefs are due. Hopefully you looked at these previous entries I posted last semester, as the info is still good. I hate to be too repetitive on here. And as you know, they must be typed.

We’ll also talk briefly about research techniques, image acquisition (including sources and rights), and design planning.

Bring your sketchbook. You’ll have the 2nd half of class to work.

photo by: SeenyaRita

There is a Creative Commons license attached to this image. AttributionNoncommercial

Creativity Recap

I think we accomplished just about everything we set out to in Monday’s class. I’ve got the Box working again, so be sure to download the file entitled AVT498_CreativityProcessElementsPrinciples.pdf, as it has links and explanations.

If you did the brain test, you became a little more self-aware. The left half of the brain is: logical, sequential, rational, analytical, objective, looks at parts. And the right half of the brain is random, intuitive, holistic, synthesizing, subjective, looks at whole. Knowing which side is more naturally dominant can help us to purposefully exercise the other half and use more of our full brains. (My theory is that most designers are fairly balanced.)

Another interesting brain teaser is the rotating silhouette figure. Is she going clockwise or counterclockwise? Although this has apparently been debunked as a method for determining brain hemisphere dominance. One thing’s for sure; of all the links, pages, lists, and diagrams about brain hemisphere functioning, most of them are ugly as sin. The people smart enough to know about the science of it are not always adept at applying visual thinking skills. (Here’s where we come in!)

With regard to your brochure topics, and tackling or addressing a problem that affects a society, get inspired by the creative work done on behalf of these issues/orgs:

Do you have other good examples? List them in the comments.

As a designer, if your job is to come up with ideas and designs, you will not have the luxury of excuses like, “oh, I’m not feeling it today.” Someone is paying you to be a designer, so you will need to figure out strategies for calling up your creative, on demand. Today we reviewed the design elements and principles, which can always help kickstart you out of the stuck bucket. We talked about having a process/methodology, because for most people creativity does not come out of nowhere. And I mentioned some books that address improving creativity. Here they are, plus a few more.

TED (Technology, Entertainment, Design) talks to check out:

Make a list, check it twice.

I’m feeling magnanimous today. I’ve retooled, updated, and expanded a checklist that I developed (originally with co-worker, Catherine Anderson) many years ago. The principles hold true, and if you want your designs to print as you imagine them in all their glory, you would be wise to follow this counsel.
Okay, pompous talk aside, there are so many pitfalls in printing, do your part and the potential errors will be minimized.
The checklist is in the Box, download and enjoy.
Also, in case you aren’t familiar with proofreaders’ marks, these sites have good reference sheets. As a designer, you will receive instructions using these symbols, so you must interpret them correctly.
This one is good for printing out. http://www.merriam-webster.com/mw/table/proofrea.htm
And actually, there are a lot of good resources on designerstoolbox.com including this handy binding styles reference. http://www.designerstoolbox.com/designresources/bindings/ Remember that you are not allowed to do velo, plastic comb, or side stitched binding for this class.

I’m feeling magnanimous today. I’ve retooled, updated, and expanded a checklist that I developed (originally with co-worker, Catherine Anderson) many years ago. The principles hold true, and if you want your designs to print as you imagine them in all their glory, you would be wise to follow this counsel.

Okay, pompous talk aside, there are so many pitfalls in printing, do your part and the potential errors will be minimized.

The checklist is in the Box, download and enjoy.

Also, in case you aren’t familiar with proofreaders’ marks, the following sites have good reference pages. As a designer, you will receive instructions using these symbols, so you must interpret them correctly.

This one is good for printing out.

This one is interactive.

This one is well-designed.

And actually, there are a lot of good resources on designerstoolbox.com including this handy binding styles reference.  Remember that you are not allowed to do velo, plastic comb, or side stitched binding for this class. They look cheap.