Tag Archives: creative brief

Links

As promised, here are some good online resources regarding Creative Briefs.
What should a CB include?
Project Overview
Background
Objective
Audience
Tone/Personality
Call to Action
Desired Outcomes
Required Elements
Specifications
Budget
Timeline
And here is more context to my comment yesterday about growing up to be whatever you want.

As promised, here are some good online resources regarding Creative Briefs.

http://www.nasuti.com/media/briefnew.pdf

http://www.slideshare.net/svcseattle/the-perfect-creative-brief

http://www.flatworldknowledge.com/pub/1.0/launch-advertising-and-promoti/28516

What should a CB include?

  • Project Overview
  • Background
  • Objective
  • Audience
  • Tone/Personality
  • Call to Action
  • Desired Outcomes
  • Required Elements
  • Specifications
  • Budget
  • Timeline

And here is more context to my comment yesterday about growing up to be whatever you want.

http://motivatethyself.com/can-our-kids-really-be-whatever-they-want-to-be/

http://truecostblog.com/2006/12/04/you-cant-be-whatever-you-want-to-be/

Truth be told, I don’t remember my parents telling me one way or another what I could be when I grew up. And as I mentioned in class, I didn’t “discover” graphic design until college. I guess my message is: be open. Be open to following a path that is as yet undiscovered.

Advertisements

Brevity is the Soul of…

As a designer, you should interact with creative briefs on a regular basis. In the professional world, I don’t think they are as ubiquitous as would be useful, but the field has the capacity to change and you can be those agents. What is a creative brief (CB) and why is it so important?
A good CB is a map that tells you how to get to your destination. It provides all the pertinent and specific information about the client, their problem, and what a solution will achieve. And it does all this in a clear, concise, and interesting manner.
As a preparer of the CB, it is essential to be as comprehensive as possible, in simple, clear language. Don’t put all kinds of marketing mumbo jumbo in it, be direct. Remember, it’s called a brief for a reason. It gives background information, explanation of the challenge to be addressed, how it will be addressed, in what format, to what audience, with what tone or personality. The CB should be a strategic document that will guide the creative development of the piece. It should not describe design decisions at this point—it is not a decorator’s playbook.
As a worker/designer on the receiving end of a CB, you need the information contained in it in order to design an appropriate, compelling design solution. If it is incomplete or dull, your design could miss the mark. So then, the CB also functions as a checker tool. Design solutions should be measured for success based on the agreed-upon goals stated in the CB, from mockups to realized completion.
There are pretty standard sections to a CB. You should do some research—online is fine—on what is included and how they are presented. Your research should compare more than a few sources because like everything on the internet, you can’t always believe what you read. If you find some good sources, post them in the comments. I’ll hold mine back until a bit later. Hint: check out slideshare.net, there’s a gem among the rubble there.
Your CB for your brochure is due on September 14. If you want to bring in a rough draft for me to look at on the 9th, you may and I will.

As a designer, you should interact with creative briefs on a regular basis. In the professional world, I don’t think they are as ubiquitous as would be useful, but the field has the capacity to change and you can be those agents. What is a creative brief (CB) and why is it so important?

A good CB is a map that tells you how to get to your destination. It provides all the pertinent and specific information about the client, their problem, and what a solution will achieve. And it does all this in a clear, concise, and interesting manner.

As a preparer of the CB, it is essential to be as comprehensive as possible, in simple, clear language. Don’t put all kinds of marketing mumbo jumbo in it, be direct. Remember, it’s called a brief for a reason. It gives background information, explanation of the challenge to be addressed, how it will be addressed, in what format, to what audience, with what tone or personality. The CB should be a strategic document that will guide the creative development of the piece. It should not describe design decisions at this point—it is not a decorator’s playbook.

As a worker/designer on the receiving end of a CB, you need the information contained in it in order to design an appropriate, compelling design solution. If it is incomplete or dull, your design could miss the mark. So then, the CB also functions as a checker tool. Design solutions should be measured for success based on the agreed-upon goals stated in the CB, from mockups to realized completion.

There are pretty standard sections to a CB. You should do some research—online is fine—on what is included and how they are presented. Your research should compare more than a few sources because like everything on the internet, you can’t always believe what you read. If you find some good sources, post them in the comments. I’ll hold mine back until a bit later. Hint: check out slideshare.net, there’s a gem among the rubble there.

Your CB for your brochure is due on September 14. If you want to bring in a rough draft for me to look at on the 9th, you may and I will.