Tag Archives: reader spreads

When you must impose…

Those of you who were in class last Wednesday know that I’ve extended the brochure due date by one class period. And the tutorials I went over in class last Monday are in the Box: type treatments and manual imposition, and auto page numbering explained.
As you know, my tutorials and demos use Adobe CS3 on a Mac (although I think I was on CS2 when I did the auto page numbering one). Make the appropriate substitutions for your own system.
Here’s a preview of the imposition PDF:
How to IMPOSE your pages…
if you have to do it on your own.
If my lecture in class and the materials I’ve already provided do not explain imposition well enough for you, go get yourself a saddle-stitched booklet and rip it apart, to analyze it. Or just look at these online sources:
Personally, I always have my printer (commercial printing company) do the imposition, especially for complicated jobs. I can never keep work and turn vs. work and tumble straight. But it’s important to understand the principles. And if I’m preparing cover documents, I will usually set up pages 4/1 and 2/3 as printer spreads.
Reader spreads: spreads (2 pages together) set up in the order in which we read them.
Printer spreads: spreads and signatures set up in the order in which they are printed, in order to print, fold, trim, and bind in the most efficient manner.
If you’ve used automatic page numbering, then you should not just rearrange pages. In order to maintain the numbering, but not invest in costly prepress/imposition software, here’s one way to do it. (Note: InDesign® now has a Print Booklet feature that automates this process.)
Read on…
And to finish it off.

Those of you who were in class last Wednesday know that I’ve extended the brochure due date by one class period. And the tutorials I went over in class last Monday are in the Box: type treatments, manual imposition, and auto page numbering explained.

As you know, my tutorials and demos use Adobe CS3 on a Mac (although I think I was on CS2 when I did the auto page numbering one). Make the appropriate substitutions for your own system.

Here’s a preview of the info in the imposition PDF:

How to IMPOSE your pages… if you have to do it on your own.

If my lecture in class and the materials I’ve already provided do not explain imposition well enough for you, go get yourself a saddle-stitched booklet and rip it apart, to analyze it. Or just look at these online sources:

http://desktoppub.about.com/od/imposition/a/imposition.htm

http://glossary.ippaper.com/default.asp?req=knowledge/article/3

Personally, I always have my printer (commercial printing company) do the imposition, especially for complicated jobs. I can never keep work and turn vs. work and tumble straight. And they usually use special imposition software that puts together many pages depending on the signature, which is determined by press sheet size, quantity, etc. But it’s important to understand the principles. And if I’m preparing a cover document, I will usually set up pages 4/1 and 2/3 as printer spreads.

  • Reader spreads: spreads (2 pages together) set up in the order in which we read them.
  • Printer spreads: spreads and signatures set up in the order in which they are printed, in order to print, fold, trim, and bind in the most efficient manner.

If you’ve used automatic page numbering, then you should not just rearrange pages. In order to maintain the numbering, but not invest in costly prepress/imposition software, here’s one way to do it. (Note: InDesign® now has a Print Booklet feature that automates this process.)

Read on…

And the finishing for the 8-page sample booklet:

print out imposed pages back to back

print out imposed pages back to back

stack the printouts

stack the printouts

staple at the center of the outside pages (saddle-stitch binding)

staple at the center of the outside pages (saddle-stitch binding) using an adjustable, long-arm stapler

fold in half

fold in half and burnish the fold

trim to the crop marks

trim to the crop marks

finishing materials: printouts, stapler, squeegee to burnish the fold, metal edged ruler with cork backing, X-Acto® knife with sharp blade, cutting mat

finishing materials: printouts, stapler, squeegee to burnish the fold, metal edged ruler with cork backing, X-Acto® knife with sharp blade, cutting mat

front of book, page 1 in a "self-cover" piece

front of booklet, page 1 in a "self-cover" piece

pages 2–3

pages 2–3

pages 4–5

pages 4–5

pages 6–7

pages 6–7

page 8, the back page, C4 (cover 4) if printed on cover stock

page 8, the back page, C4 (cover 4) if printed on cover stock