Tag Archives: typography

Good Reads, Good Resources

I know you’re working hard on your book insides. And on revised covers for the guest critique on Wednesday… But I wanted to share some resources for you to feed the beast. (That would be your brain.)

Some type textbooks nowadays have websites to support their mission as well as provide extra content:

The online journal, Thinking for a Living is chock-full of interesting articles, including one on Emil Ruder.

Ellen Lupton has numerous essays online.

And finally (for today), there’s a great eight-minute video on Hatch Show Print from the Smithsonian’s traveling exhibit.

Advertisements

Back from Break

Good critiques this week, folks, thanks. Don’t forget, visit the flickr group to give and get additional feedback.

Although there was a previous post on pairing typefaces, Hoefler & Frere-Jones just this week released an email newsletter addressing that topic. You can find it online. And speaking of email newsletters from type foundries, you should sign up for them—all you can find—because they frequently contain interesting and educational info on type.

Sign up:

Just a reminder that Wednesday’s lecture on intellectual property and copyright is summarized in a post from last semester, with links to more info.

Layout for the first fourth of your book is due Monday. Bring in printouts for peer critiques (I will circulate during class.) Manuscripts are due Wednesday, March 24.

Selecting and Pairing Typefaces

There are many resources on the web for how to select typefaces, and which typefaces go well together. To summarize some key points:

  • Read the text, understand the design goals, and pick appropriate typefaces.
  • Pick one or two families of type to do most of the “work” of your design (a serif and/or a sans serif).
  • Consider a third as accent type (a display or script face), if needed.
  • Pick robust families if needed, with extended character sets like old style figures, true small caps, fractions, extra ligatures, alternative characters, etc.
  • Do not mix two serif families, or two sans serif families, or two scripts, etc., as they are too close but not the same, and exude an uneasy feeling.
  • Use adjectives to describe what your type looks like, feels like, and make sure it matches up with the objectives of the project.
  • Evaluate your choices: does result/effect match intention/goal?

Two short web articles on choosing fonts are collected here.

Four web resources for pairing fonts are bookmarked here. (Thanks to John Orrand for a couple of these.)

These should help you as you finalize your brochure and complete your Flickr exercise #2. If you know of any other good resources, list them in the comments.

Bodoni and Futura

Bodoni and Futura were the approved Hecht's department store (now defunct) typefaces.

When you must impose…

Those of you who were in class last Wednesday know that I’ve extended the brochure due date by one class period. And the tutorials I went over in class last Monday are in the Box: type treatments and manual imposition, and auto page numbering explained.
As you know, my tutorials and demos use Adobe CS3 on a Mac (although I think I was on CS2 when I did the auto page numbering one). Make the appropriate substitutions for your own system.
Here’s a preview of the imposition PDF:
How to IMPOSE your pages…
if you have to do it on your own.
If my lecture in class and the materials I’ve already provided do not explain imposition well enough for you, go get yourself a saddle-stitched booklet and rip it apart, to analyze it. Or just look at these online sources:
Personally, I always have my printer (commercial printing company) do the imposition, especially for complicated jobs. I can never keep work and turn vs. work and tumble straight. But it’s important to understand the principles. And if I’m preparing cover documents, I will usually set up pages 4/1 and 2/3 as printer spreads.
Reader spreads: spreads (2 pages together) set up in the order in which we read them.
Printer spreads: spreads and signatures set up in the order in which they are printed, in order to print, fold, trim, and bind in the most efficient manner.
If you’ve used automatic page numbering, then you should not just rearrange pages. In order to maintain the numbering, but not invest in costly prepress/imposition software, here’s one way to do it. (Note: InDesign® now has a Print Booklet feature that automates this process.)
Read on…
And to finish it off.

Those of you who were in class last Wednesday know that I’ve extended the brochure due date by one class period. And the tutorials I went over in class last Monday are in the Box: type treatments, manual imposition, and auto page numbering explained.

As you know, my tutorials and demos use Adobe CS3 on a Mac (although I think I was on CS2 when I did the auto page numbering one). Make the appropriate substitutions for your own system.

Here’s a preview of the info in the imposition PDF:

How to IMPOSE your pages… if you have to do it on your own.

If my lecture in class and the materials I’ve already provided do not explain imposition well enough for you, go get yourself a saddle-stitched booklet and rip it apart, to analyze it. Or just look at these online sources:

http://desktoppub.about.com/od/imposition/a/imposition.htm

http://glossary.ippaper.com/default.asp?req=knowledge/article/3

Personally, I always have my printer (commercial printing company) do the imposition, especially for complicated jobs. I can never keep work and turn vs. work and tumble straight. And they usually use special imposition software that puts together many pages depending on the signature, which is determined by press sheet size, quantity, etc. But it’s important to understand the principles. And if I’m preparing a cover document, I will usually set up pages 4/1 and 2/3 as printer spreads.

  • Reader spreads: spreads (2 pages together) set up in the order in which we read them.
  • Printer spreads: spreads and signatures set up in the order in which they are printed, in order to print, fold, trim, and bind in the most efficient manner.

If you’ve used automatic page numbering, then you should not just rearrange pages. In order to maintain the numbering, but not invest in costly prepress/imposition software, here’s one way to do it. (Note: InDesign® now has a Print Booklet feature that automates this process.)

Read on…

And the finishing for the 8-page sample booklet:

print out imposed pages back to back

print out imposed pages back to back

stack the printouts

stack the printouts

staple at the center of the outside pages (saddle-stitch binding)

staple at the center of the outside pages (saddle-stitch binding) using an adjustable, long-arm stapler

fold in half

fold in half and burnish the fold

trim to the crop marks

trim to the crop marks

finishing materials: printouts, stapler, squeegee to burnish the fold, metal edged ruler with cork backing, X-Acto® knife with sharp blade, cutting mat

finishing materials: printouts, stapler, squeegee to burnish the fold, metal edged ruler with cork backing, X-Acto® knife with sharp blade, cutting mat

front of book, page 1 in a "self-cover" piece

front of booklet, page 1 in a "self-cover" piece

pages 2–3

pages 2–3

pages 4–5

pages 4–5

pages 6–7

pages 6–7

page 8, the back page, C4 (cover 4) if printed on cover stock

page 8, the back page, C4 (cover 4) if printed on cover stock